STD Testing from home

Have fun & feel safe: Protect your own and your partners health by testing for sexually transmittted diseases regularly. Check for everything from HIV to Chlamydia from the comfort & privacy of your own home.

360° STD Tests

Checks for almost all
important STDs.

Basic STD Tests

Checks for the two most
common STDs.

Premium STD Test

Checks for the four most
serious STDs.

Feel safe with the 360° STD Tests

360° STD Check for Women

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tests for HIV, Syphillis, Hepatitis B & C, Chlamydia & Tripper in women

consists of 2 tests, one vaginal swab and one capillary blood test

sample is taken from home, analysis & official lab report by Swiss lab

360° STD Check for Men

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tests for HIV, Syphillis, Hepatitis B & C, Chlamydia & Tripper in men

consists of 2 tests, one urine test and one capillary blood test

sample is taken from home, analysis & official lab report by Swiss lab

How our STD tests from home work

Order your test

If you order your test before 5:30 pm, it wil arrive the next working day with Swiss Post.

Take your sample from home

With our test kits you can easily take a blood, urine or swab sample yourself. Never done this before? No worries, step by step instructions are included in your test kit.

Send your sample to the lab

Drop your sample off in any Swiss Post mailbox with the included Retourbox.

Receive your results online

Access your results online within 2-3 days. Guaranteed without medical jargon & clear instructions on what to do.

Basic STD Tests

Check for most common STDs Chlamydia & Gonorrhea (Tripper)

Female Basics
STD Test

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  • ✔️checks for Chlamydia & Gonorrhea in your vagina
  • ✔️right test for women after vaginal sex

Male Basics
STD Test

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✔️checks for Chlamydia & Gonorrhea in your penis

✔️right test for men after all type of sex
 

Oral
STD Test

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✔️checks for Chlamydia & Gonorrhea in your throat

✔️right test after giving oral sex
 

Anal
STD Test

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✔️checks for Chlamydia & Gonorrhea in your anus

✔️right test after receiving anal sex
 

What our customers have to say

Super professional, fast and reliable.

Testing finally is made easy and without any need to visit a doctor.

Arek, May 2021

Great service.

I found the whole process seamless and straightforward. Would 100% recommend.

Thomas, January 2021

Perfect.

Quick delivery, clear instructions and easy to use.

Gwendolen, April 2021

Premium STD Test

Check for most serious STDs HIV, Syphillis and Hepatits B & C

Premium STD Test

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tests for HIV, Syphillis, Hepatitis B & Hepatitis C

results within 2-3 days online, including official lab report

sample is taken from home and analysed by Swiss lab

Learn more about sexually transmitted diseases

Chlamydia

  1. Chlamydia is very common, but many people don't realise they have it. You can get it more than once.
  2. Chlamydia infection may have long term health consequences.
  3. Chlamydia can easily be prevented by regular screening and early treatment for sexually active people with changing sex partners.

Symptoms

50% of men and even 70% of women who have Chlamydia don't show symptoms. Many people unknowingly infect their partners. The most common symptom you experience? A text message from an ex, who claim they got it from you or gave it to you. If you have symptoms, these usually show 1-3 weeks after you have been in contact with Chlamydia. Typical symptoms include:

Woman: Pain while urinating, unusual vaginal discharge, pain in the tummy or pelvis, pain during sex, bleeding after sex, bleeding between periods

  • Men: Pain while urinating, white, cloudy or watery discharge from the tip of the penis, burning or itching in the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body), pain in the testicles

Long-term health risks

  • Women

    Untreated Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea are the most common causes of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID). PID is an infection of the female reproductive organs. It may ultimately lead to chronic pain or infertility. As the symptoms of PID can be mild, you may not be aware of having it until the damage is done.

    Unborn child

    If you have a PID and it is not timely treated, it may cause the fertilized egg to nest outside of the womb (ectopic pregnancy). It can not survive there.

    When you have a regular pregnancy, the gynaecologist usually tests you for Chlamydia, as Chlamydia can cause a premature birth. Chlamydia may also be passed on to the baby, leading to e.g. pneumonia or an eye infection.

    Men

    Men do not always suffer long term effects, but you remain contagious to your sex partners. The most common longer term effect is inflammation of the testicles. It can also lead to Reactive Arthritis and even infertility.

    Sources: NHS, Mayo Clinic

Treatment

Chlamydia is typically treated with antibiotics. Which exact antibiotics you are given depends on individual factors.

No sex!

Don't have sex from the moment you were tested until the end of your treatment, as you are putting your partner in danger. If your partner was infected as well, wait with sex till you are both clean. Some antibiotics require you to abstain until a week after taking them.

Inform, test and treat sex partners

Chlamydia is transmitted primarily through sex. You got it from someone else, who may not be aware of having it. If you had sex with more than one person since your last test, you may have infected them as well. Inform everyone whom you had sex with during the last 6 months or since the last time you have tested.

Retest

If symptoms persist, a retest is recommended. People under 25 are strongly advised to retest after 3 months, even without symptoms. If your initial test was with us, you qualify for a discount on your retest. Please contact our Support.

Risk groups

In 2019, there were 12.410 cases of Chlamydia in Switzerland. In other words: 145 of every 100'000 persons were diagnosed with Chlamydia. The highest risk group are young women, aged 20-24. Since the year 2000, the numbers continue to increase rapidly 📈.

Chlamydia is most often diagnosed with young sexually active people. Sexual preference (straight, gay, etc.) doesn't seem to make much of a difference. 59% of the "victims" are female, 40% are male. Chlamydia is more widely spread in cities and suburbs, than in the less populated countryside. Especially Kantons Geneva, Basel City and Zürich are risk areas.

Using a condom is reducing your risks of contracting Chlamydia by some 80%, so that is not a guarantee to stay clean.

Gonorrhea ("The clap")

  1. Gonorrhea is highly contagious and is the second most common reportable sexually transmitted disease in Switzerland.
  2. You can get it by having unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has it. It can spread without ejaculation.
  3. In women, gonorrhea often doesn't cause symptoms, but even without, the disease can be passed on.

Symptoms

Gonorrhoea is also known as Tripper or The Clap. Many people who have Gonorrhoea show symptoms within 1-10 days after contracting it. Sometimes it takes up to several months before symptoms show. However, 50% of women and 10% of men do not develop any obvious symptoms. Thus, many of them unknowingly infect their partners.

The most common symptom you experience? Very unpleasant bathroom breaks, because of pain with urinating and abnormal watery/thin and yellow/greenish colour discharge. Other symptoms include:

Women: Pain or tenderness in the lower abdominal area, bleeding between periods, heavier periods, bleeding after sex

Men: Inflammation or swelling of the foreskin, pain or tenderness in the testicles

Long-term health risks

  • Women

    10-20% of untreated cases of Gonorrhoea lead to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID). Together with Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea is the most common cause of PID. PID is an infection of the female reproductive organs, which may ultimately result in chronic pain or infertility. As the symptoms of PID can be mild, you may not be aware of having it until the damage is done.

    Unborn child

    If a you have a PID and it is not timely treated, it may cause the fertilized egg to nest outside of the womb (ectopic pregnancy). It can not survive there.

    When you have a regular pregnancy, Gonorrhoea can cause a premature birth or even a miscarriage. Gonorrhoea may also be passed on to the baby, potentially leading to an eye infection. If untreated, such infection can cause permanent vision damage.

    Men

    Men are less susceptible to long term effects, but you remain contagious to your sex partners. The most common longer term effect is a painful infection in the testicles and prostate gland. In rare cases this may lead to reduced fertility.

    Sources: NHS, Mayo Clinic

Treatment

Gonorrhoea is typically treated with antibiotics: an injection in your thigh or buttocks or by pills. Which exact antibiotics you are given depends on individual factors.

No sex!

Don't have sex from the moment you were diagnosed until the end of your treatment, as you are putting your partner in danger. If your partner was infected as well, wait with sex till you are both clean. Some antibiotics require you to abstain until a week after taking them.

Inform, test and treat sex partners

Gonorrhoea is transmitted primarily through sex. You got it from someone else, who may not be aware of having it. If you had sex with more than one person since your last test, you may have infected them as well. Inform everyone whom you had sex with during the last 6 months or since the last time you have tested.

Retest

It is recommended to confirm being clean with a retest, 2 weeks after you have finished the treatment. Obviously, if symptoms persist a retest is also recommended. If your initial test was with us, you qualify for a discount on your retest. Please contact our Support.

Risk groups

In 2019, there were 3.917 cases of Gonorrhoea in Switzerland. In other words: 46 of every 100'000 persons were diagnosed with Gonorrhoea. The highest risk group are non-heterosexual men, aged 25-44. In the past 3 years, the number of infections was booming 📈.

Gonorrhoea is most often diagnosed with homosexual men, of all ages. In (only) 1 out of 6 cases, the "victim" is female, which may be due to the lack of symptoms in women and the resulting lack of testing. Almost 1 out of 3 concerns heterosexual men. Gonorrhoea is more widely spread in cities and suburbs than in the less populated countryside. Especially Kantons Zürich, Basel City and Geneva are risk areas.

Using a condom is reducing your risks of contracting Gonorrhoea by some 80%, so that is not a guarantee to stay clean.

HIV

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is a virus that attacks cells with are part of the body’s immune system. It thus infiltrates the immune defenses and cannot be eliminated.
  2. While there’s no cure for HIV yet, effective HIV treatment, known as antiretroviral therapy, can reduce the amount of virus to undetectable levels, allow people to live a normal life and prevents the virus' transmission to others.
  3. It is possible to get infected with HIV and not know it. According to CDC in the US one in seven people currently infected do not know they are.

Symptoms

HIV typically runs in 3 stages:

Stage 1: Acute HIV Infection

About two-thirds of people will develop symptoms that feel like a really bad flu during the first two to four weeks after infection, the rest might don't get any symptoms at all. Fever may develop along with additional symptoms, such as sore throat, swollen glands, mouth sores, rashes, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, and muscle and joint pain.

Stage 2: Clinical Latency

Without diagnosis or treatment the immune system can bring the virus level down some, but it can’t completely control or eliminate it. The virus is still active but multiplies more slowly, often without causing any symptoms. This stage can last up to 15 years. At this stage, people with HIV who aren’t taking medication still have a sufficient amount of virus in their system to transmit it to others, even if they don’t have symptoms, and the virus continues to damage the immune system over that time, leading to worsening health.

Stage 3: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrom (AIDS)

The immune system is so severely weakened that other infections - so called opportunistic infections -, which can be easily fought in healthy individuals, spread through the body. These include pneumonia, fungal infections, and virus-induced cancers. Additionally, people with AIDS frequently have systemic symptoms such as prolonged fevers, sweats (particularly at night), swollen lymph nodes, chills, weakness, and unintended weight loss.

Long-term health risks

Without diagnosis and treatment, HIV leads to increasingly severe immunodeficiency and eventually serious secondary infections or cancer. The body is not able to control or eliminate an HIV infection. Without adequate therapy, HIV infection inevitably leads to death.

Treatment

A variety of HIV medications are available. All of them aim to reduce the virus load in the body as much as possible, so that symptoms disappear and there is no danger of passing on the virus. For an adequate therapy, a combination of different drugs is necessary, which is known as "HIV combination therapy". This combination therapy is a lifelong treatment. A complete cure is unfortunately not yet possible.

Risk groups

According to an estimate by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), there are currently roughly 37 million (range between 34 and 41 million) people living with HIV or AIDS worldwide. According to recent estimates, around 16'600 HIV-infected people live in Switzerland. In 2020, 290 new HIV diagnoses were made, the trend is decreasing since 2008.

  • According to Swiss Federal Office of Health the majority of reported HIV cases concerns men (about 79%) . Sex with other men was cited as the most common route of infection (50.8%). This was followed by heterosexual contacts (26.5%). The use of contaminated injectables for intravenous drug use (IDU) was found in 2.2%. Women diagnosed with HIV in 2020 mainly contracted the infection through heterosexual routes (69.6 %), similar to previous years. 93% of all persons living in Switzerland with HIV in 2020 have a corresponding diagnosis and thus knew of their infection

After a risk situation, such as unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse (especially in a region with a high number of infected people) or at the start of a new relationship, having an HIV test is a good option as it provides clarity and safety.

Syphillis

  1. Syphilis is a bacterial infection that's typically spread through sexual contact.
  2. The first sign of syphilis is most commonly a painless sore, called a chancre, that develops where the bacteria entered the body.
  3. After the initial infection the bacteria can lie dormant in the body for years before becoming active again. With no visible symptoms, the only way to know that you have syphilis is to be tested for it.

Symptoms

Syphillis can present in one of four different stages and max also occur congentially:

Primary

Approximately 2-6 weeks after sexual contact a skin lesion, which is called a chancre, develops at the side of contact. There may be single or multiple sores, which are usually firm, round, and painless and can often go unnoticed. The sore(s) typically last three to six weeks with or without treatment.

Secondary

Secondary syphilis occurs approximately four to ten weeks after the primary infection. While it is known for the many different ways it can manifest, symptoms most commonly involve the skin, which manifest itself in a rough rash with red or reddish-brown spots. Other symptoms include fever, sore thorat, sores in mouth, vagina or anus, muscle aches, fatigue etc.

Latent

If syphilis goes untreated, it moves from the secondary stage to the latent or hidden phase, where there are no symptoms. This stage is defined by a serologic proof of infection without symptoms of disease. This stage can last for years, and the signs and symptoms may never come back or the disease can progress to the third, or tertiary stage.

Tertiary

Approximately 15 to 30 percent of people infected with syphilis who don’t get treatment will develop late or tertiary syphilis. It may be divided in gummatous syphilis, which is characterized by formation of soft tumor-like balls of ski, bone and liver, late neurosyphilis, which is an infection of the central nervous system with most often severe complications, and cardiovascular syphilis. People with tertiary syphilis are not infectious.

Congenitally

Syphillis can be transmitted during pregnancy or during birth. Two-thirds of syphilitic infants are born without symptoms. Symptoms, which can develope are enlargement of liver and splen, rash, fever, infection of the nervous system and lung inflammatio

Long-term health risks

Long term health risks include infection of the nervous system with neurologic impairment even at an early stage and development of a tertiary Symphillis with severe complications such as serious neurologic damage, cardiovascular problems or disfiguring skin changes.

Treatment

Syphillis is easy to treat in early stages and can often be cured with just one injection of antibiotic. It just has to be diagnosed by proper testing.

Risk groups

The number of syphilis cases is increasing again worldwide, principally in highly developed countries, including Switzerland. An increased risk of infection exists mainly for men who have sex with men, for persons with numerous different sexual partners and in the context of prostitution. Since 2010, more than 400 persons in Switzerland have contracted syphilis each year, more than 80% of whom are men.

Condoms reduce the risk of getting infected with syphilis. But an infection is possible despite condom use. It is important to detect and treat an infection early. Therefore, regular testing before entering a new relationship or in risk constellations such as frequently changing sexual partners (especially men with men) is useful and recommended.

Hepatits B

  1. Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver that is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). An infection may be either acute (self-limiting) without any long-term consequences or chronic (long-standing) with severe impairment of the quality of life.
  2. Sexual intercourse and intravenous drug use are the most frequent routes of infection in westerly countries.
  3. An available vaccination reliably protects against infection.

Symptoms

The acute infection begins with general ill-health, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, body aches, mild fever, and dark urine. It progresses to development of jaundice. The illness lasts for a few weeks and then gradually improves in most affected people. The infection may be entirely asymptomatic and may go unrecognized but also severe courses with liver failure have been described.

Long-term health risks

In older adolescents and adults, chronicity of the disease occurs in about 3-5%. A chronic inflammation may lead to cirrhosis over a period of several years. This type of infection dramatically increases the incidence of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). Other associated long-term consequences are kidney diseases (membranous glomerulonephritis) or polyarthritis.

Treatment

Acute hepatitis B infection does not usually require treatment and most adults clear the infection spontaneously. Antiviral treatment is available for severe cases and for chronic infection to reduce the risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Risk groups

According to Federal Office of Health in Switzerland, about 0.5% of the population are infected with the hepatitis B virus, while worldwide figures average around 3.5 %. Around 40 cases of acute hepatitis B are notified per year in Switzerland, with a downward trend. Men are much more affected by acute hepatitis B; they make up about 75% of cases. The age group 35-60 years makes up the majority of cases (roughly 55%).

Hepatitis C

  1. Hepatitis C is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) that primarily affects the liver. The virus persists in the liver in about 75% to 85% of those initially infected. Over many years it often leads to liver disease and cirrhosis.
  2. Only about 20 to 30 percent of people with hepatitis C will develop signs and symptoms of the virus soon after being infected. Some people learn of it only after years when developing severe health issues.
  3. There’s currently no vaccine that can prevent hepatitis C.

Symptoms

About 70 to 80 percent of people who become infected with acute hepatitis C do not show any symptoms at first. When symptoms appear it usually happens 4-12 weeks after infection. Symptoms are generally mild and vague, and may include fatigue, nausea and vomiting, fever, muscle or joint pains, abdominal pain, decreased appetite and weight loss. Jaundice, dark urine, and clay-coloured stools may also occur.

About 80% of those exposed to the virus develop a chronic infection over several years. Chronic hepatitis C can be associated with fatigue and mild cognitive symptoms and may lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Long-term health risks

Without proper treatment 75 to 85 percent of people with hepatitis C develop a chronic infection, which can last a lifetime. Chronic hepatitis C can lead to hepatitis C–related complications, including chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver cancer.

Treatment

A variety of well-performing antiviral medications are available for the treatment of hepatitis C. Various combinations are available depending on the individual course of the disease.

More than 90% of people with chronic infection can be cured when treated with medications.

Risk groups

According to Federal Office of Health in Switzerland, about 0.5 % of the population are infected with the hepatitis C virus, while worldwide figures average around 1 %. The number of people reported with acute hepatitis C has remained stable in Switzerland since 2006; about 50 new cases are reported each year. The share of men is consistently high, amounting to around 70 %; young adults 20 to 39 years old are also affected to a significant degree (about 60 to 65 % of cases). The majority of newly diagnosed infections can be traced back to intravenous drug use, but there is a non-negligible number of transmissions through sexual intercourse.

Because of the lack of symptoms, only testing after risk contact will bring clarity.